Ruben Salazar Documentary Airs on PBS April 29

Ruben-Salazar-Man-in-the-Middle

Ruben Salazar: Man in the Middle  is a documentary about the life and death of Ruben Salazar, a Mexican-American journalist who was killed by a law enforcement agent during a National Chicano Moratorium March against the Vietnam War in 1970. Salazar was a very accomplished reporter, correspondent and columnist at the Los Angeles Times.  The documentary is directed by Phillip Rodriguez (Brown is the New Green) and will be aired on PBS stations across the country. Check local TV listings. April 29-May 1.

@SFLucho

Latino Experience Docs

Lots to see but you only want to see films about the experience and contributions of Latinos in the US?  Here are a few films that may be for you. Filmmakers are expected to attend.

Latinos Beyond Reel by Miguel Picker and Chyung is making its San Francisco Premiere. This documentary packs a punch in thoroughly looking at media- film and tv- and how Latinos are depicted. Despite the demographic shifts in the country- 1 in 6 people are Latino- Latinos are largely absent and when they are on screen, the images are less than positive. Screens at Opera Plaza Cinema – Sept 14  1:15PM.

StableLife_FilmStill_JockeyHorseStable Life by Sara MacPherson is a touching film that profiles a family working and living at a horsetrack just outside of San Francisco.  It’s a sensitive account of one family’s challenges- work, home, immigration status, raising children- as well as their commitment, dedication, and tenacity to each other. Screens at Opera Plaza Cinema – September 15 3:15PM 

Everything Comes From the Streets, directed by Alberto Lopez Pulido, is making its World Premiere in San Franicsco! The film provides a very complete study on lowriders- from the early days in 1950’s through today. Do you know what jacket clubs are? Come out to the film and you’ll learn about that and other nuances to what is really a cultural phenomenon. Screens at Opera Plaza Cinema – Sep 15, 2013 1:00 PM

Here’s the link to tickets and passes. All details easy to see.

 

 

The Undocumented on PBS/KQED, Independent Lens

Though the immigration debate focuses on the living, most seem to forget those that don’t make it across and end up dying in the desert. The Undocumented by Marco Williams looks at the migrant that doesn’t make it.

Border Patrol agents, Native Americans, smugglers, ranchers, retirees and samaritans form a constellation of people engaged with the Arizona/Mexico border on a daily basis — policing it, inhabiting it, crossing it, working it, making it safer or simply feeling its consequences. But at the center of it all is the migrant.

Airs in the San Francisco Bay Area as of April 29, 2013.

Happy Birthday, Rita!

HEY,YOU GUYS!  The iconic Rita Moreno turned 81 this week (December 11)!

If you know what that line is from that’s probably one of the first times you saw Rita. She screamed the opening line of the Electric Company, the PBS children’s show that aired from 1971-1985. Rita is a singer, dancer, and actor with many credits to her name in film, tv, stage, and music. You probably have seen her in West Side Story (1961) as Anita, the role for which she is best remembered and which earned her an Oscar as Best Supporting Actress.  If you’re a fan of cable programming, perhaps you saw her on HBO’s OZ,  the prison dramatic series where she played Sister Pete, a psychiatrist nun counseling prisoners. She’s currently on TV Land’s “Happily Divorced”  where she plays Fran Drescher’s mother.

Rita is entertainment royalty. She’s part of an elite small club of artists that have won an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony award.  She was also honored with the National Medal of Arts in 2009 by President Barack Obama.

Happy birthday & many more, Rita!

@SFLucho