Rare Latin American Noir Films at Noir City 12 Festival Starts January 24 – Castro Theater

Noir City 12 runs from January 24 to February 2 at the Castro Theater in San Francisco. We’re giving away several pairs of tickets for double/tripple film programs on January 25, 30, & 31.  The line up of films includes an impresive selection of seven rare Latin American/Spanish from Argentina, Spain, and Mexico. Email us at programming (at) sflatinofilmfestival.com with your name and the date of the program you would like to see or in-box us in Facebook. Visit http://bit.ly/1ewbtg3 for full program details.

Saturday, Jan 25 Matinée Triple Bill
Border Incident
Scr. John C. Higgins. Dir. Anthony Mann United States, 1949. 94 min.
Screens at 12:00 PM
Agents of both countries go undercover to bust a gang exploiting migrant workers on the U.S.-Mexico border. Mann’s rugged direction and John Alton’s stunning cinematography enhance this powerful crime drama. With Ricardo Montalban, George Murphy, Howard Da Silva, Charles McGraw.

 

VictimsOfSin_Ninon_Baila2Victims of Sin / Victimas del Pecado
Scr. Emilio Fernandez and Mauricio Magdelano. Dir. Emilio Fernández. Mexico, 1951. 90 min.
Screens at 4:00 PM

A dancer-prostitute (the fabulous Ninón Sevilla) rescues a baby from the garbage and is determined to raise it, despite her poverty and the threats of her pachuco pimp. The apotheosis of the Mexican cabaretera film, a combustible combo of music, dance and noir melodrama. Absolutely astounding!

In the Palm of Your Hand / En la Palma de Tu mano
Scr. José Revueltas and Roberto Gavaldón, from a story by Luis Spota. Dir. Roberto Gavaldón. Mexico, 1951. 90 min.
Screens at 2:00 PM

A con artist seduces the widow of a millionaire, only to learn she’d plotted with her lover to murder the late husband. A tense game of cat-and-mouse ensues—but who’s the cat? Perhaps the greatest thriller ever made in Mexico, starring Arturo de Córdova and Leticia Palma.

 

Thursday, Jan 30 Double Feature
Never Open That Door / No Abras Nunca Esa Puerta
Scr. Alejandro Casona, from stories by Cornell Woolrich. Dir. Carlos Hugo Christensen. Argentina, 1952. 85 min.
Screens at 7:15PM

A pair of classic Woolrich short stories, “Someone on the Phone” and “The Hummingbird Comes Home” are transposed to Buenos Aires with stunning results. Featuring camerawork by the great Pablo Tabernero, it’s better than most U.S.-made Woolrich adaptations.
NOT ON DVD

Hardly a Criminal / Apenas un delincuente
Scr. Raimundo Calcagno and Israel Chas de Cruz. Dir. Hugo Fregonese. Argentina, 1949 88 min.
Screens at 9:00 PM

A bank employee (Jorge Salcedo) uses a loophole in Argentine law to concoct the perfect crime, planning to reap the rewards of his embezzlement after serving six years in prison. A vivid cross between Naked City and Brute Force, and an evocative look at mid-20th century Buenos Aires.

Friday, January 31 Double Feature
The Black Vampire / El Vampiro Negro
Scr. and Dir. Román Viñoly Barreto. Argentina, 1953. 80 min.
Screens at 7:30 PM
VampiroNegroThis clever “feminist” reworking of Fritz Lang’s classic M focuses on the mothers of children stalked by a deranged pedophile. Virtually unknown outside Argentina, and presented onscreen in the U.S. for the first time ever, in a new 35mm print! Starring the radiant Olga Zubarry.
NEW 35mm PRINT!

 

 

 

 

The Wages of Fear / Le salaire de la peur
Scr. Jérôme Géronimi and H.G. Clouzot, from Georges Arnaud’s novel. Dir. Henri-Georges Clouzot. France, 1953. 156 min.
Screens at 9:00 PM

Four men, trapped in a pestilent South American village, agree to transport a dangerous shipment of nitroglycerine through treacherous terrain. This existentialist action movie is arguably the most suspenseful film ever made. Yves Montand and Charles Vanel star, and earn every cent.

Get your Almodovar Fix at the Castro April 11

Part of what makes the Castro Theater such a treasure is the programming. This month for example there were three days of a sing-a-long screening of Disney’s Beauty and the Beast then drag performer Miss Coco Peru  the next day followed by Django Unchained. I’m happy to see that in that eclectic mix of films and performances that classic films, Oscar winners, film festivals and foreign films all have a grand film palace for people to see them as they’re meant to be seen: on the big screen.

PedroAlmodovar_2011_cannesFFThis month they’ll be screening a couple of Pedro Almodóvar films. You can catch All About My Mother at 4:55PM & 9:10PM and Talk To Her at 2:45 and 7PM, Thursday April 11th.

Talk to Her: 2002 Spain  Comedy/Drama
Two men share an odd friendship while they care for their girlfriends who are both in deep comas.

All About My Mother: France/Spain 1999  Comedy/Drama
Young Esteban want to become a writer and also to discover the identity of his father, carefully concealed by the mother Manuela. Won an Academy Award for Best Foreign Film.  Stars Marisa Paredes, Cecilia Roth, Penélope Cruz, Antonia San Juan


@SFLucho

 

Latin American Films at 56th SF International Film Festival

There are several Iberian and Latin American films in this year’s San Francisco International Film Festival which runs from April 25-May 9th.  With screenings, panels, parties, and awards, the festival offers up a wide array of activities for the casual to the die-hard cinephile. 

Some of the Iberian and Latin American titles include:

The Artist and The Model from Spain by Fernando Trueba. An agin painter and his wife discover a beautiful, waiflike young woman wandering the streets whom they take in as his model in this story by 1994 Oscar winner Fernando Trueba (Belle Epoque) about artists and their muses.

The Cleaner from Peru by Adrián Saba. As a mysterious epidemic kill Lima’s adult population- but spares its children- a solitary middle-aged forensic worker discovers an orphaned boy at one of his cleanup sites. When he takes in the traumatized boy, it eases his own isolation and a subtle transformation takes hold of both of them. 

Crystal Fairy from Chile by Sebastian Silva. From the director of The Maid (Sundance Jury Prize winner in 2009), an American in Chile joins up with three lanky brothers and a spaced out hippie chick to seek out the perfect high of a desert psychedelic in this partially improvised road movie. Stars Michael Cera.

After Lucia from Mexico by Michel Franco. After this wife’s death in a car accident, Roberto moves to Mexico City with his teenage daughter Alejandra. While they are close, their repressed grief and lack of communication threatens to unhinge them when Ale becomes the victim of a brutal bullying at school.

La Sirga a co-production from Colombia/France/Mexico by William Vega  A shy teenage girl, cast out of her home by a fire which also destroyed her parents, seeks shelter with a handful of denizens of the shores of a lagoon in this coming-of-age tale set in the lonely, enchanted landscapes of the high Andes where everyone quietly nurtures illusions of success and fantasies of intimacy with other humans.

Habi, The Foreigner from Argentina/Brazil by María Florecia Alvarez. In a film that explores what it means to feel like an outsider and examines the role of culture in self-definition, this is a coming-of-age story that traces 20-year-old woman’s spontaneous attempt to create a new identity for herself as a Lebanese orphan in Buenos Aires. North American Premiere. 

Il Futuro  from Argentina Through their relationship with a pair of bodybuilders, an orphaned brother and sister stumble on an opportunity they can’t refuse: seemingly easy money by way of a former Mr. Universe turned reclusive movie star. This is more than crime drame. It’s a meditation on time, aging, identity and the movies. An adaptation of Roberto Bolaño’s novella.  

They’ll Come Back from Brazil by Marcelo Lordello A potent exploration of class and adolescence, Cris is a privileged teen, who after being left on the side of the road as punishment for bickering with her brother, embarks on a journey that will open her eyes to a world she never knew as she tries to find her way home.

Mai Morire from Mexico by Enrique Rivero. In the ethereal, nearly pre-Columbian landscapes of the Mexican town of Xochimilco, a stoic woman returns home to care for her 99-year-old mother nearing the end of her life. Haunting and meditative. The film shows the experience of  her mother’s death as a beautiful, natural event. 

Visit Festival.SFFS.org for more detailed information about the festival and these particular films.

@SFLucho