USF Human Rights Film Festival Apr 4-6

The 11th USF Human Rights Film Festival runs from April 4-6 at Presentation Theater located on 2350 Turk Blvd x Masonic in San Francisco.  It’s free and open to the public.

The film selection is fantastic. It includes shorts and feature documentaries by established and emerging filmmakers. Oscar nominated films are part of this festival: The Invisible War and 5 Broken Cameras.  Highlighted are two which involve US Latino or Latin American contexts:

April 4 1:30 PM REPORTERO, 2011, Mexico/US, Dir. Bernardo Ruiz Follows veteran reporter Sergio Haro and his colleagues at Zeta, a Tijuana, Mexico-based weekly, as they dauntingly ply their trade in what has become one of the most deadly places in the world to be a journalist.

April 5 4:45 PM THE HARVEST/LA COSECHA: THE STORY OF THE CHILDREN WHO FEED AMERICA, 2011, US, Dir. U Roberto Romano Every year there are more than 400,000 American children who are torn away from their friends, schools and homes to pick the food we all eat. Zulema, Perla and Victor labor as migrant farm workers, sacrificing their own childhoods to help their families survive. It’s a powerful film that exposes the exploitation of children in the United States.

Visit http://bit.ly/USFHumanRightsFF for the full schedule of films.

 

Attention Bay Area Documentary Makers- SF Foundation Grant Opp

Call for Proposals: Bay Area Documentary Fund

Many award winning documentaries have emerged from the San Francisco Bay Area. In recognition of this notable documentary tradition, The San Francisco Foundation invites accomplished film/video/digital media artists to apply to the Bay Area Documentary Fund for early production support. Last year, the Bay Area Documentary Fund granted $125,000 to seven documentary movies.

This year, grants ranging from $10,000 to $25,000 will be given to support documentary projects in early production phases by experienced filmmakers with an esteemed body of previously created work.

Projects should address issues pertinent to the five Bay Area counties we serve – Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, or San Mateo – and align with the Foundation’s programmatic goals. The San Francisco Foundation is interested in documentaries exploring issues that have been historically underexposed, misinterpreted, or ignored.

Complete proposals are due Friday, April 12, 2013, by 11:59 p.m.

For complete eligibility requirements, application instructions, and evaluation criteria, please visit our Bay Area Documentary Fund page.

Please note that this application requires an online application as well as submission of previously completed work.

If you have additional questions, please contact Tere Romo, Arts and Culture program officer, at 415.733.8523 or tromo@sff.org.

Kate del Castillo Stars in K-11

This one had me do a double-take! Kate del Castillo as a trans inmate, done-up chola-style! Wow! It’s playing at the Roxie Theater in San Francisco this week.

The film follows  a powerful record producer who wakes from a drug-induced blackout to find himself locked up and classified “K-11.” Plunged into a nightmarish world ruled by a transsexual diva named Mousey (Kate del Castillo), Raymond is truly a fish out of water. Complicating matters are a troubled young transgender named Butterfly (Portia Doubleday), a predatory child molester (Tommy ‘Tiny’ Lister) and the ruthless Sheriff’s Deputy, Lt. Johnson (D.B. Sweeney). Ray’s struggle to contact the outside world and regain his freedom seems impossible, but he must learn to navigate this new power structure if he is ever going survive and be in control of his life again.

Spanish Cinema under the Franco Regime, Pacific Film Archive Starts March 29

The UC Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archives (BFA/PFA) in Berkeley will present the series The Spanish Mirth: the Comedic Films of Luis Garcia Berlanga from March 29 through April.  Visit the BAM/PFA website for the series details.

Luis Garcia Berlanga (1921-2010) was a Spanish filmmaker who wrote and directed some of Spain’s most important films during the Francisco Franco dictatorship. Using satire and irony, Berlanga evaded censors to deliver his barbs against the regimeand a style of film that helped shape Spanish cinema thereafter.  Berlanga received many honors and accolades from the most prestigious film festivals including Cannes, Berlin, Karlovy, and Montreal; served as the head of the jury at Berlin;  was nominated for an Oscar for Placido ; won a Goya Award for Everyone to Jail!  in 1980.

Here are notes about three of the seven films:

Friday, March 29, 2013
7:00 p.m. ¡Bienvenido, Mr. Marshall!
Luis García Berlanga (Spain, 1953). A tiny Spanish backwater pulls out all the stops to reinvent itself as a postcard-perfect Andalusian village—complete with flamenco dancing, bullfights, and more—in order to impress delegates doling out financial rewards in Berlanga’s satirical jab at Spanish national values. (86 mins)

Thursday, April 4, 2013
7:00 p.m. Plácido
Luis García Berlanga (Spain, 1961).  A charity campaign suggests “Sit a Poor Person at Your Table” in Berlanga’s frantic, gag-riddled romp. Filled with hilarious barbs, impious prattle, and high society comeuppance, you’ll revel in a surplus of black humor. (85 mins)

Wednesday, April 17, 2013
7:00 p.m. La escopeta nacional
Luis García Berlanga (Spain, 1978). Archival print! An oily manufacturer sponsors a hunt on the estate of a nobleman who has fallen on hard times. Berlanga’s madcap Escopeta (Shotgun) stays on target with a load of high-impact and hilarious shot. (95 mins)

“Rita Moreno: A Memoir” in Bookstores & Online

RitaMorenoMemoirCover

Whenever you hear the song “America” from West Side Story, no doubt Rita Moreno comes to mind. Moreno’s ‘Anita’ won her the Oscar and stardom. She is in the exclusive club of artists that have won the grand slam of arts awards including an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar, and a Tony…plus a Golden Globe and the National Medal of Honor.

At 80, Moreno is still singing, dancing, acting and writing.  Performing since the age of 7, Rita was discovered by Louis B. Mayer, the famed filmmaker of old Hollywood who remarked upon seeing her that she looked like a ‘Spanish’ Elizabeth Taylor.  Moreno was in her late teens/early twenties when she was rubbing shoulders with the greats of old Hollywood- Clark Gable, Yul Brynner, Gene Kelly, Marlon Brando- and yes, Elizabeth Taylor, too.

Last year Moreno starred in her autobiographical one-woman show, Life Without Makeup, to rave reviews at the Berkeley Repertory Theater. Earlier this month she released  Rita Moreno: A Memoir.  Born Rosa Dolores Alverío in Humacao, Puerto Rico, her mother moved the family to New York City when she was 3. She takes us on her life journey once again- as an immigrant, as a starlet, and as a heartbroken young woman. To say she was involved with bad boy Marlon Brando is an understatement; infidelity, an unwanted pregnancy, and a suicide attempt made for good tabloid fodder publicly but privately it was a source of much pain.

Get the book and read all about Rita.

@SFLucho

Bay Lights, Art Installation by light sculptor Leo Villareal

If you’re in San Francisco, make your way to the Embarcadero waterfront and be prepared to linger. To celebrate the opening of the new eastern span of the Bay Bridge, built 75 years ago, a large scale art installation will brighten the skyline for the next two years starting tonight.

The Bay Lights by renown light sculptor Leo Villareal consists of 25,000 white LED bulbs attached to the north side cables of the Bay Bridge and linked to a laptop programmed to  “play” rhythmic patterns that never repeat.  Covering an area 1.5 miles wide and 500 feet high, this is an impressive public art display that will bring sparkle and panache to San Francisco’s other iconic bridge.

@SFLucho